Encyclopedia of Stanford Trees, Shrubs, and Vines

Pinus ponderosa. PONDEROSA PINE. Western North America
PINACEAE (Pine family)

Widely distributed through the Rocky Mountains into Canada, in the Cascades, and in the mountains of California, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico, ponderosa pine stands in the United States outnumber those of any other tree, except Douglas fir. Its range includes parts of the Santa Cruz Mountains a few miles south of Stanford. The 6-inch dark green needles arethree to a cluster and the prickly cones are about 5 inches long. The tree is closely resembles Jeffrey pine. The champion of all pines, a ponderosa, is in Sierra National Forest with a height of 175 feet (1968). [Michael Geordie comments in October, 2008: "the champion of all pines is a sugar pine P. lambertiana 81m tall: http://www.conifers.org/pi/pin/index.htm, http://www.conifers.org/pi/pin/lambertiana.htm"].

An old specimen with a 4-foot girth is in the northwest corner where Campus Drive crosses Palm Drive, 50 feet from the path leading to the Mausoleum and 27 feet from the Palm Drive footpath. Younger specimens are in Lathrop Park, well uphill from 809 Lathrop Drive.

Illus. right: seed cone from George B. Sudworth. Forest Trees of the Pacific Slope. USDA, 1907. Click for larger image.

A simple key to campus pines.

Other campus pines: Pinus brutia ssp. eldarica | Pinus bungeana | Pinus canariensis | Pinus contorta | Pinus coulteri | Pinus densiflora | Pinus edulis | Pinus halepensis | Pinus jeffreyi | Pinus maximartinezii | Pinus mugo | Pinus muricata | Pinus nigra | Pinus patula | Pinus pinea | Pinus ponderosa | Pinus radiata | Pinus roxburghii | Pinus sabiniana | Pinus sylvestris | Pinus thunbergiana | Pinus torreyana | Pinus wallichiana

Illustrations (links open new windows): CalPhotos

Additions/Revisions:

Name derivation, genus | species The Latin name | heavy (the wood)

Related material: Canopy Trees for Palo Alto Tree Library | treatment in Jepson Manual | Gymnosperm Database

Botanical name index | Common name index | Family
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