Callistemon citrinus (C. lanceolatus). LEMON BOTTLEBRUSH. Australia
MYRTACEAE (Myrtle family)

C. citrinus, which has a less weeping habit than C. viminalis, can be seen at the Fire Station, Escondido Village, and West Campus Drive in median by Cogen. Several new plantings (Summer 2007) are seen in the Greenbelt about 200 yards south of Stanford Ave on the west side of the path; these trees are staked.

A tall shrub or small tree, 10 to 30 feet high. Leaves narrow, about 3-4 inches long, sharp-pointed at the apex; coppery when new, mature leaves are vivid green and smooth on both surfaces, the midrib and lateral veins prominent. Flower-clusters 2 to 4 inches long, bright red, the stamens about 1 inch long. Capsules ovoid, contracted at the summit. Frequently cultivated in gardens and parks.

adapted from McMinn, Howard E. and Evelyn Maino. 1951. An illustrated manual of Pacific coast trees; with lists of trees recommended for various uses on the Pacific coast by H. W. Shepherd. 2d ed. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press.

Dwarf bottlebrush, Callistemon 'Little John' was planted in 2013 along Bonair siding where it crosses the center divider of the two one-way lanes of Campus Drive; in bloom January, 2014.

Illustrations (links open new windows):

Additions/Revisions:

Callistemon and Melaleuca: Key to Species

Leaves simple; branches passing through compact cylindrical or spherical clusters of sessile capsules and continuing as foliage shoots (illustration)

Stamens united at their bases into 5 groups opposite the petals.................Melaleuca
Stamens not united..................................................................................Callistemon:

Leaves needle like, about 1-inch long; flower clusters rose-pink, anthers yellow.........C. brachyandrus
Leaves leaf-like with a prominent midrib; flower clusters bright red:

Lateral veins of leaves distinct; capsules contracted at summit...1. C. citrinus
Lateral veins of leaves somewhat obscure; capsules not contracted at summit...2. C. viminalis

Name derivation, genus | species: from the Gk kallistos, most beautiful, and stemon, a stamen, in reference to the characteristic long, showy stamens | lemony, scent of crushed leaves

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